Technical Report


Using UML for Modeling a Distributed Java Application


Author(s): Klaus Bergner, Andreas Rausch, Marc Sihling
Year: 1997
Number: TUM-I9735
Editor:
CR Classification: A.1.,C.2.4.,D.1.3.,D.2.0.,D.2.2.,D.2.7.,D.3.3.
CR General Terms: Design, Documentation, Experimentation
Keywords: Object-Oriented Software Engineering, Modeling, Analysis, Design, UML, Java, RMI
Abstract:The Unified Modeling Language consists of a set of mostly graphical description techniques for the specification and documentation of object-oriented systems. We describe the experiences gained while using UML 1.0 for the development of a small, distributed Java program for planning break supervision schedules in schools. Our motivation in this case study is not only to evaluate the techniques provided by UML and Java, but also to study their interrelationships and their methodical use from requirements analysis to implementation. Based on our observations some proposals for extensions and changes to the UML are made. Because the example is complete and self-contained and provides methodical guidelines and hints, it can also be used as a tutorial for UML 1.0 and for object-oriented development in general.


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BibTeX-Entry:

@techreport{ TUM-I9735, author = {Klaus Bergner and Andreas Rausch and Marc Sihling}, title = {Using UML for Modeling a Distributed Java Application}, number = {TUM-I9735}, institution = {Technische Univerit\"at M\"unchen}, year = {1997}, url = {http://www4.informatik.tu-muenchen.de/reports/TUM-I9735.html}, abstract = {The Unified Modeling Language consists of a set of mostly graphical description techniques for the specification and documentation of object-oriented systems. We describe the experiences gained while using UML 1.0 for the development of a small, distributed Java program for planning break supervision schedules in schools. Our motivation in this case study is not only to evaluate the techniques provided by UML and Java, but also to study their interrelationships and their methodical use from requirements analysis to implementation. Based on our observations some proposals for extensions and changes to the UML are made. Because the example is complete and self-contained and provides methodical guidelines and hints, it can also be used as a tutorial for UML 1.0 and for object-oriented development in general. }, CRClassification = {A.1.,C.2.4.,D.1.3.,D.2.0.,D.2.2.,D.2.7.,D.3.3.}, CRGenTerms = {Design, Documentation, Experimentation} }